Video: Muzzleloader Mule Deer Hunt in Utah


An impressive muley comes at the end of a muzzleloader hunt in Utah with Zac Griffith.

From Griffith:

“This is the best typical mule deer I’ve ever taken. I’ve never worked harder for a deer.”

To check out more from Zac Griffith, click here.

Video: Bowhunting High Country Mule Deer in Utah


Hitting the high country for mule deer in Utah.

From Hushin:

“Every year we kick of our big game season with a Utah high country mule deer hunt and this year was pretty special……”

To check out more from Hushin, please click here.

Video: Late Season Bowhunting for Utah Mule Deer


Some late season bowhunting action in Utah turns fruitful.

From the video maker:

“Here’s a video highlighting Utah’s late season Extended Archery Hunt. Watch this solo hunt that’s filmed with a head cam and makes for one cool POV on this nice mule deer buck!”

To check out more from Hushin, please click here.

Video: Utah Bowhunting for Mule Deer


Do-it-yourself hunting (and stalking) mule deer in Utah in a video from Justin Finch.

From Finch:

“My self filmed, 2016 Utah archery hunt. Kill shot included! After a 4 hour stalk, I find myself 42 yards of a bedded buck.. Somehow I got lucky enough to capture the entire journey on film.

This is the 1st of 3 videos in my series called, “THE TREBLE”; which shows my adventures on three deer hunts in three different states with three different weapons all from my 2016 season. Look for Part 2 “Colorado Muzzeloader Hunt” and Part 3 “Idaho Rifle Hunt” coming in the next couple weeks!

100% real, DIY, and self filmed.”

To checkout more from Justin Finch, click here.

Small Utah Project Has Big Public Access Dividends

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

From the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—Sportsmen and women now have permanent access to 3,800 acres of National Forest land in central Utah thanks to a collaborative effort between the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Manti-La Sal National Forest, Back Country Horsemen of Utah and Emery County.

“This project shows how working together can bring about improved public access that benefits hunters, hikers, horseback riders and so many other people who enjoy our national forests,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

“The American public benefits greatly by acquiring this property which allows access to some of the best country for hunting and horseback riding on the Manti-La Sal National Forest” said Darren Olsen, district ranger for the Manti-La Sal National Forest.

The project site is located approximately 20 miles west of Huntington and secures permanent public access from a parking area on Highway 31 to the popular Candland trailhead.

RMEF recently conveyed the 10-acre parcel of land to the Manti-LaSal National Forest which now oversees management responsibilities. Back Country Horsemen of Utah (BCH), San Rafael Chapter, originally acquired grant funding and coordinated trailhead construction. Emery County donated thousands of dollars in equipment use, labor and materials.

“The Candland Mountain trailhead more than triples the parking for users of the Candland Mountain trail system,” said Rod Player of San Rafael BCH. “It would not be possible were it not for the generous donations from Emery County and RMEF. RMEF has ensured the existence of the trailhead for future generations.”

“Emery County appreciates the opportunity to partner in this project which will benefit residents of the county as well as visitors to our area,” said Ray Petersen, Emery County public lands administrator. “The Emery County Road Department displayed its typical professionalism in constructing this parking area. We are very proud of the work they do. As is often the case, it takes a willingness to collaborate by many partners to accomplish beneficial results on our public lands.”

The area accessed by the trailhead is primarily elk spring through fall habitat, including calving areas, and is used by more than 1,000 elk. It is also home to mule deer, black bears, mountain lions and a host of bird and animal life.

RMEF’s Torstenson Family Endowment (TFE) provided funding for the project. TFE funding is used solely to further RMEF’s core mission programs of permanent land protection, habitat stewardship, elk restoration and hunting heritage.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 220,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK. Take action: join and/or donate.

Petition: Stop Sale of Utah Public Lands

backcountry-hunters-anglers

Yet again, public lands are under attack in the Western United States. According to Backcountry Hunters & Anglers, 4,000 acres of public state land are set to be sold off. This is land that will be forever lost.

To sign the petition the keep public lands public, click here.

3,800 Acres of Public Land Opened to Utah Hunters, Others

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

From the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation worked with the U.S. Forest Service to purchase a 10-acre tract that permanently protects access to 3,800 acres of public lands in central Utah.

“Opening and securing public access is core to our conservation mission,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “This small transaction has a funnel-like effect in helping hunters, hikers and other people reach a much larger publicly-administered landscape.”

The project is located approximately 25 miles west of Price in the Electric Lake area of the Manti-LaSal National Forest. It secures permanent public access from a parking area on Highway 31 to a trailhead used by elk and deer hunters, many of whom use it to pack in and set up camps.

The area accessed by the trailhead is primarily elk spring through fall habitat, including calving areas, and is used by more than 1,000 elk. It is also home to mule deer, bear, mountain lions and a host of bird and animal life.

Because of liability concerns, there was a very real concern the area may be closed by the previous landowner, but RMEF purchased and plans to convey the property to the Forest Service. RMEF purchase of the property ensures this trailhead will remain open for hunters and recreationists.

RMEF’s Torstenson Family Endowment (TFE) provided funding for the project. TFE funding is used solely to further RMEF’s core mission programs of permanent land protection, habitat stewardship, elk restoration and hunting heritage.

 

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of nearly 220,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 6.9 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK. Take action: join and/or donate.