Public Access Dispute Solved in Central Oregon

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The public will continue to have access to 43,000 acres of central Oregon’s prime elk country thanks to a group effort including the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Bureau of Land Management, Crook County, Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and the Waibel Ranches, LLC.

“We are pleased that all parties could come together to provide continued access to a part of Oregon revered by elk hunters and others,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Opening or improving access to our public lands lies at the core of our conservation mission. We hear time and time again from our members how important it is that we carry out this public access work.”

At issue was what was thought to be a public road through private land south of Prineville in the Crooked River drainage that provided access to the southern end of Ochoco National Forest. RMEF provided title work and research that showed continuous public use of the road since the late 1800s.

Waibel Ranches, LLC facilitated the construction of the new road at their own expense and at their own initiative. They did so in order to provide access to the same public lands as a means to reduce the liability, trespass, poaching and littering associated with public travel along the old Teaters Road.

“It’s great to have a partner like RMEF to help find solutions to public land access issues,” said Dennis Teitzel, Prineville BLM district manager.

“This project provides access for hunters and all others that could have been lost without the cooperation and efforts of several organizations. The landowners should be thanked for their willingness to work to solve a problem for the benefit for all,” said Richard Nelson, OHA Bend Chapter past president. “It shows what can be accomplished when all work on a solution instead of locking in to an adversary position.”

Since 1986, RMEF and its partners completed 875 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Oregon with a combined value of more than $57.4 million. These projects protected or enhanced 793,317 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 90,073 acres.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org,www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.

Video: The Pack Out in “This IS Hunting”


The pack out is highlighted in a new video from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“As the sun begins to touch the distant horizon, it signifies the end to another September day in elk country. However, the work is hardly over for the elk or for the hunter. Time is of the essence now as hundreds of pounds of fresh organic meat must now be properly cared for and hauled back to camp. Hours of prepping and packing seem to fade away in moments of reflection and appreciation for the hunt and the animal. What seems like a never ending trail is promised to end by the glow of a warm fire. This IS Hunting…”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.

2018 RMEF Elk Camp Heads to Arizona

 

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is heading to the sunny Southwest to hold its 2018 Elk Camp March 15-18 in Chandler, Arizona.

“There is nothing like the energy and enthusiasm generated by our members and volunteers at Elk Camp,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “We are excited to get together in Arizona to celebrate our conservation mission and milestones.”

As of July 1, 2017, RMEF has conserved or enhanced more than 7.14 million acres of elk habitat and opened or improved access to 1.15 million acres for hunters, anglers, hikers and others to enjoy. RMEF recently eliminated alllong-term debt for the first time in its 33-year history and is also riding eight consecutive years of record membership growth.

The Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass will host 2018 Elk Camp. As in past gatherings, RMEF will celebrate its accomplishments during Volunteer Fun Night as well as two other nightly events including auctions. Elk Camp will also offer various “Taste of Arizona” events including a desert jeep tour, an excursion to historic downtown Scottsdale and Major League Baseball spring training games (schedules/locations yet to be announced by MLB teams). In addition, attendees may play nearby championship golf courses and take part in other on-site activities such as boating, horseback riding or sitting down at Arizona’s only five-star restaurant.

RMEF will announce its world class entertainment performers and other information in the near future.

Full registration is now open and available here.

RMEF held its 2017 national convention in Nashville, Tennessee.

Current Elk Camp 2018 sponsors include ALPS OutdoorZ, Browning, Sitka, US Bank and BMO Wealth Management.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org,www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.

Video: Sibling Montana DIY Bowhunting


Two brothers took on DIY bowhunting ventures in Montana, and things went pretty well!

From Eastmans’:

“Watch a pair of bowhunting brothers hunt elk in western Montana. Zac Renner will never forget the experience of harvesting his first archery bull. Older brother Jake arrows a bull at 30 yards only two weeks later. Read their full story in the November/December issue of Eastmans’ Bowhunting Journal.”

To check out more from Eastmans’, click here.

Elk Habitat Protected in Wyoming

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and Natural Resources Conservation Service worked with a private landowner to permanently protect 2,132 acres of wildlife habitat in southeast Wyoming.

“This conservation easement maintains large-scale habitat connectivity in a portion of Wyoming that benefits a wide range of wildlife including elk, mule deer, turkey and plains sharp-tailed grouse,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

“Through partnerships between the NRCS, private landowners, and lands trusts such as the RMEF, conservation through easements will continue into perpetuity, allowing future generations the opportunity to enjoy open spaces and wildlife,” said Astrid Martinez, state conservationist, NRCS Wyoming.

The landscape features native rangeland, sage brush steppe, several springs and stands of Ponderosa pine, cottonwood and box elder. That habitat translates into vital year-round and winter range for up to 500 elk.

The Natural Resources Conservation Service, Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust, Wyoming Governors Big Game License Coalition, Wyoming Game and Fish and RMEF’s Torstenson Family Endowment (TFE) provided funding for the project.

“We are grateful to landowners like these who understand the importance of their property’s habitat resource values while carefully managing their land and water for wildlife and livestock alike,” added Henning.

This conservation easement shares three linear miles of its southern border with the 2013 RMEF Cottonwood Creek project that permanently protects 3,329 acres of elk habitat and buffers nearby Bureau of Land Management and Wyoming state lands.

RMEF uses TFE funding solely to further its core mission programs of permanent land protection, habitat stewardship, elk restoration and hunting heritage.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org,www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.

Video: DIY Public Land Bowhunting for Oregon Elk


A new video from Kristy Titus takes on a do-it-yourself elk hunt in Oregon on public land. This is the way to do it!

From Kristy Titus:

“Thank you for tuning in to watch Kristy Titus’ premier episode to the Pursue The Wild digital series. Within this episode, Kristy and her father Lewis pursue archery elk on public land in Oregon with an over the counter general season tag. This episode is the heart of Kristy’s family. Being in the backcountry together sharing time on the mountain, the miles traveled, close calls and missed opportunity. This is the essence to what drives Kristy and her father to return to the mountain year after year in pursuit of elk. The family bond and friendships forged on the mountain and the memories that are created, are priceless. This is the greatest gift that comes from the hunt, this is our legacy in action. We hope that you enjoy this episode as much as Kristy and her father did creating it.”

To check out more from Kristy Titus, click here.

Video: Public Land Bowhunting for Elk


The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has rolled out another episode of their new series which highlights the importance of access to public lands. In this video, hunters take on elk in Oregon.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“Lewis and Kristy Titus hunt DIY style on public land in Oregon.”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.