Public Access Dispute Solved in Central Oregon

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The public will continue to have access to 43,000 acres of central Oregon’s prime elk country thanks to a group effort including the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Bureau of Land Management, Crook County, Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and the Waibel Ranches, LLC.

“We are pleased that all parties could come together to provide continued access to a part of Oregon revered by elk hunters and others,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Opening or improving access to our public lands lies at the core of our conservation mission. We hear time and time again from our members how important it is that we carry out this public access work.”

At issue was what was thought to be a public road through private land south of Prineville in the Crooked River drainage that provided access to the southern end of Ochoco National Forest. RMEF provided title work and research that showed continuous public use of the road since the late 1800s.

Waibel Ranches, LLC facilitated the construction of the new road at their own expense and at their own initiative. They did so in order to provide access to the same public lands as a means to reduce the liability, trespass, poaching and littering associated with public travel along the old Teaters Road.

“It’s great to have a partner like RMEF to help find solutions to public land access issues,” said Dennis Teitzel, Prineville BLM district manager.

“This project provides access for hunters and all others that could have been lost without the cooperation and efforts of several organizations. The landowners should be thanked for their willingness to work to solve a problem for the benefit for all,” said Richard Nelson, OHA Bend Chapter past president. “It shows what can be accomplished when all work on a solution instead of locking in to an adversary position.”

Since 1986, RMEF and its partners completed 875 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Oregon with a combined value of more than $57.4 million. These projects protected or enhanced 793,317 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 90,073 acres.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org,www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.

Video: DIY Public Land Bowhunting for Oregon Elk


A new video from Kristy Titus takes on a do-it-yourself elk hunt in Oregon on public land. This is the way to do it!

From Kristy Titus:

“Thank you for tuning in to watch Kristy Titus’ premier episode to the Pursue The Wild digital series. Within this episode, Kristy and her father Lewis pursue archery elk on public land in Oregon with an over the counter general season tag. This episode is the heart of Kristy’s family. Being in the backcountry together sharing time on the mountain, the miles traveled, close calls and missed opportunity. This is the essence to what drives Kristy and her father to return to the mountain year after year in pursuit of elk. The family bond and friendships forged on the mountain and the memories that are created, are priceless. This is the greatest gift that comes from the hunt, this is our legacy in action. We hope that you enjoy this episode as much as Kristy and her father did creating it.”

To check out more from Kristy Titus, click here.

Video: Public Land Bowhunting for Elk


The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has rolled out another episode of their new series which highlights the importance of access to public lands. In this video, hunters take on elk in Oregon.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“Lewis and Kristy Titus hunt DIY style on public land in Oregon.”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.

Video: Bowhunting Rainforest Elk in Oregon


Thick northwest rainforest Roosevelt elk in Oregon are pursued in a video from Born and Raised Outdoors. This is one for the record books!

To check out more from Born and Raised Outdoors, click here.

Video: A John Day River Bighorn Sheep Adventure


A dream hunt taken to a whole new level as a team of hunters float the John Day River in search of bighorn sheep.

From the filmmakers:

“Join Mike Stanton and friends on an adventure down the John Day River as we pursue a once in a lifetime opportunity after California bighorn sheep.”

To check out more from Rogue Wild Productions, click here.

Wildlife, Riparian Habitat Protected, Access Improved in Oregon

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

MISSOULA, Mont.—The largest private inholding in Oregon’s most popular and biggest wilderness area is now in public hands and open to public access thanks to a collaborative effort between the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the U.S. Forest Service.

The project permanently protects 471 acres adjacent to the Eagle Cap Wilderness in northeast Oregon and improves access to nearly 23,000 additional acres of surrounding public land.

“This area contains vital habitat for elk and a myriad of other wildlife and fish species,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

Located southwest of the town of Joseph and directly west of Wallowa Lake, the narrow property runs approximately two miles in length. It serves as an important elk transition area as it lies between elk summer range in the high country and winter range in the lowlands. Mule deer, white-tailed deer, bighorn sheep, and mountain goats are also present within the surrounding area.

Additionally, Little Granite Creek and Falls Creek, two major tributaries to Hurricane Creek, cross the property. Spring Chinook salmon use the waterways for spawning. The creeks also provide crucial riparian habitat for other wildlife.

“In addition to improving public access for hunters, this project also ensures unimpeded access to Hurricane Creek and Falls Creek Trails, two of the most popular trails that provide access to the Eagle Cap Wilderness, including access to Legore Lake, said to be the highest true lake in Oregon at 8,950 feet in elevation,” added Henning.

RMEF conveyed the 471 acres to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest which now oversees its management.

Vital funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund helped complete the project.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

Video: Bowhunting for Central Oregon Mule Deer

A Second Chance in November – Archery Mule Deer Hunting in Oregon from Joe Cima – Mountain Made Media on Vimeo.

Throwback to a great video in Oregon of bowhunting for mule deer.

From Mountain Made Media:

“A Second Chance in November follows friend of Mountain Made Media, Stefan Dunn, as he looks to fill his late season archery tag, in central Oregon.
After looking over a bunch of deer, we got in close to a unique 5×4, but unfortunately Stefan’s arrow didn’t fly true.
We kept hunting hard, and looking over bucks, until he got a second chance on a pretty 4×4 we name Crab Claw.
A great archery buck, and so many great memories made with friends, that will last a lifetime!”

To check out more from Mountain Made Media, please click here.