Video: Bowhunting Bull Elk in New Mexico


A new video from the The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation follows a bowhunter as he looks for elk in New Mexico.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“Follow along on our 2017 In Season hunt with first time elk hunter Cooper Davis as he begins to learn about the progression of the rut and finding a mature bull.”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.

Video: Elk Pursuits in “This IS Hunting”


Outstanding elk hunting footage from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“As the herd moves off from the downed monarch, the circle of life continues without pause. New opportunity arises for the younger satellite bulls to collect their own harems for the first time ever. The celebration of a fresh kill and food for the hunter indicates a strong and healthy herd and is something he gives thanks for… This IS Hunting”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.

Montana Elk Habitat Conserved, Opened to Public Access

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

MISSOULA, Mont.—A key wildlife landscape previously threatened by subdivision in northwest Montana is now permanently protected and in the public’s hands thanks to a collaborative effort between the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, a conservation-minded family and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

“This property lies within the popular Holland Lake recreational area of the scenic Swan Valley and there was some pressure to develop it,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “We appreciate the landowners for recognizing the wildlife values of the land and reaching out to us to help conserve it.”

The 640-acre parcel offers important summer and winter habitat for elk and whitetail deer. It is also provides key habitat for grizzly bears, Canada lynx and a vast array of other wildlife. Additionally, it contains riparian habitat via springs and a chain of wetland ponds that feed a tributary of Holland Creek.

Located about 65 miles north of Missoula, the property lies west of the Swan Mountain Range and is nestled between the Bob Marshall Wilderness to the east and Mission Mountain Wilderness to the west. It was previously an inholding within the Flathead National Forest but thanks to its conveyance, it now falls under the ownership umbrella of the USFS and belongs to all citizens.

”This acquisition will improve public land access, and help to preserve the recreation setting and valuable wildlife habitat in the popular Holland Lake area,” said Rich Kehr, Swan Lake district ranger.

The Holland Lake project is one of the first to receive 2017 funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Since 1985, RMEF and its partners completed 967 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Montana with a combined value of more than $160.2 million. These projects protected or enhanced 818,826 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 289,532 acres.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.orgwww.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

Elk Habitat Permanently Protected in Colorado


From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation partnered with a conservation-minded landowner, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) and Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) to permanently protect 524 acres of prime wildlife habitat in west-central Colorado.

“We appreciate the private landowners for recognizing the important wildlife values of their land and taking action to permanently protect it,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

Located about 35 miles east of Grand Junction, the Bull Creek project provides summer, winter and transitional range as well as a migration corridor through adjacent Bureau of Land Management land for elk and mule deer. It’s also an important calving ground for elk and lies within Colorado’s Grand Mesa, the largest flat top mountain in the world.

“Projects such as Bull Creek and partnerships with Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation highlight the very core of our conservation values and beliefs,” said J.T. Romatzke, CPW area wildlife manager. “The ability to ensure the perpetuation of elk habitat and benefits to sportsman is nothing more than exceptional. It is an honor for CPW to collaborate with RMEF and many others on projects that truly have longevity and resource purpose.”

In addition to providing quality habitat for big game, birds and other animal life, the property also includes vital riparian habitat. It encompasses more than three miles of waterways including the South Canal and a portion of Bull Creek.

Nearly half of the project’s funding came from a Great Outdoors Colorado grant. The organization invests a portion of Colorado Lottery proceeds in projects that protect or enhance Colorado’s parks, trails, rivers, open space and wildlife heritage.

“It’s critical for Colorado’s future that we have families like this one with the vision to permanently protect their land. GOCO is proud to have invested critical funding to help bring that vision to fruition and protect critical wildlife and river habitat,” said Chris Castilian, GOCO executive director.

Since 1987, RMEF and its partners completed 704 conservation and hunting heritage projects in Colorado, including two in Mesa County, with a combined value of more than $161 million dollars. These projects conserved or enhanced 438,443 acres and opened or secured access to 108,179 acres.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.orgwww.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

Bass Pro Shops Hosts Elk Country Conservation Month

RMEF BPS

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—For the 11th year in a row, Bass Pro Shops will generate funds for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and its conservation mission of ensuring the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage.

Bass Pro Shops will host Elk Country Conservation Month for the entire month of August.

“We are truly thankful for a valued partner that takes action by continuing to show its leadership and commitment to fish and wildlife conservation as well as our hunting heritage,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO.

In-store patrons who visit Bass Pro Shops across the United States during August will have the opportunity to round up their purchases to support RMEF’s mission.

“We want to give our customers the opportunity to contribute to the RMEF and its ongoing conservation efforts,” said Martin MacDonald, Bass Pro Shops director of conservation. “Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris also established a matching program from Bass Pro to RMEF by donating an additional 50 percent of the cumulative customer donations during the month of August.”

Thanks to a partnership spanning 17 years and still running, Bass Pro Shops contributed more than $1.5 million dollars to RMEF’s conservation mission. Between customer donations and the Bass Pro 50 percent match, the Elk Country Conservation Month program itself so far generated more than $880,000.

Since 1984, RMEF and its partners so far completed 10,832 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects with a combined value of more than $1 billion. These projects protected or enhanced more than 7.1 million acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to more than 1.1 million acres of public land.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.orgwww.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

Elk Fit to Benefit Hunters, Public Access

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

MISSOULA, Mont.—Elk Fit, a nutritional program inspired by a partnership between the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and MTN OPS, offers tangible benefits for elk hunters and their ability to access more public land.

“We appreciate our conservation partners at MTN OPS who see eye-to-eye with our mission priorities,” said Steve Decker, RMEF vice president of Marketing. “This program not only assists the individual elk hunter but it helps us open the door for hunters to access more wildlife habitat.”

Elk Fit is a line of supplements designed to aid the nutritional needs of elk hunters by helping them lose weight and increase strength and focus. A portion of the proceeds of each sale go toward RMEF’s Access Elk Country Initiative which seeks to open or secure access to 250,000 acres of elk country over a five-year period.

“We at MTN OPS believe that conservation is the key to the future of hunting, public land access and the preservation of the species we love to hunt, said Casey Harbertson, MTN OPS co-founder and chief marketing officer. “Conservation is at the heart of our mission. It is our goal to make sure we do our part for our families and the next generation of outdoorsmen and women so they enjoy the same benefits we enjoy today.”

The Access Elk Country Initiative utilizes various tools including grants to state agency access programs, acquisitions or exchanges involving checkerboard ownership of lands, strategic acquisitions of small parcels that unlock large blocks of previously land-locked public land and re-routing roads or securing access easements to provide legal passage to large tracts of public land.

Combining both its historic and ongoing public access efforts, RMEF has so far opened or improved access to more than 1.1 million acres of elk habitat across 23 different states.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

Department of Interior Announces Recovery and Delisting of Yellowstone Grizzly Population


From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The U.S. Department of Interior announced the recovery of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population as well as its intent to remove federal protections and return management to state agencies.

“The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation supports the delisting of grizzly bears,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “It’s been a long time coming and we think this is the appropriate move by Secretary Zinke and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.”

The Yellowstone population rebounded from as few as 136 bears in 1975 to an estimated 700 today. Confirmed sightings of grizzlies are taking place in locations where they have not previously been seen for more than 100 years as they extend their range in the Northern Rockies.

“This achievement stands as one of America’s great conservation successes; the culmination of decades of hard work and dedication on the part of the state, tribal, federal and private partners,” said U.S, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “As a Montanan, I’m proud of what we’ve achieved together.”

The Yellowstone grizzly population meets all delisting criteria. These factors include not only the number and distribution of bears throughout the ecosystem, but also the quantity and quality of the habitat available and the states’ commitments to manage the population from now on in a manner that maintains its healthy and secure status.

“We do caution everybody to manage their expectations about the potential of hunting grizzly bears. The reality is there will be very minimal hunting of grizzly bears for the next several years. Those who oppose the delisting are going to try and use ‘trophy hunting’ as a major obstacle and reason not to delist grizzly bears. It’s purely rhetoric and propaganda,” added Allen.

The final rule, and the supporting documents, will publish in coming days in the Federal Register and the rule will take effect 30 days after publication.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 220,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK. Take action: join and/or donate.