Video: The Pack Out in “This IS Hunting”


The pack out is highlighted in a new video from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“As the sun begins to touch the distant horizon, it signifies the end to another September day in elk country. However, the work is hardly over for the elk or for the hunter. Time is of the essence now as hundreds of pounds of fresh organic meat must now be properly cared for and hauled back to camp. Hours of prepping and packing seem to fade away in moments of reflection and appreciation for the hunt and the animal. What seems like a never ending trail is promised to end by the glow of a warm fire. This IS Hunting…”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.

Video: Public Land Bowhunting for Elk


The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has rolled out another episode of their new series which highlights the importance of access to public lands. In this video, hunters take on elk in Oregon.

From The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

“Lewis and Kristy Titus hunt DIY style on public land in Oregon.”

To check out more from The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, click here.

Wildlife Habitat Permanently Protected in Colorado

From theRocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation teamed up with conservation-minded landowners and Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) to permanently protect 1,742 acres of prime elk and greater sage grouse habitat in northwest Colorado. The project also improves public hunting in a limited draw unit.

“We appreciate landowners who look outside of themselves and recognize the vital importance of protecting their land,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Protecting this property will maintain its wildlife, agricultural and habitat values while also benefitting nearby public lands.”

The tract is nearly surrounded by public lands. It is also adjacent to the Diamond Breaks Wilderness Study Area and just a few miles away from Dinosaur National Monument and Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge.

“Projects like this protect migration corridors and enhance the connectivity of wildlife habitat. In this particular case, more than 238,000 acres of landscape are now knitted together for the benefit of wildlife and its habitat,” added Henning.

Located in the Pot Creek and Dry Creek watersheds, tributaries of the Green River, the property is key summer and winter range for big game and home to more than 500 elk as well as mule deer and other bird and animal life. It is also core greater sage grouse range and lies within a two-mile radius of leks in both Colorado and Utah, one of which contains more than 60 males.

Though the conservation easement is on private property, the landowner granted a public access easement to CPW allowing public elk hunts every year going forward in the highly limited draw unit of Game Management Unit 1.

“CPW will manage the hunts and public hunters will be allowed to access the landlocked BLM-administered lands,” said Bill de Vergie, CPW’s area wildlife manager from Meeker. “This is very beneficial for wildlife and our sportsmen and I’m glad to see it happen.”

The landowner previously placed a RMEF conservation easement on a 796-acre plot of adjacent ranch land immediately across the border in Utah.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 220,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at http://www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK. Take action: join and/or donate.

RMEF Renews Support for Foundation for Wildlife Management

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

From the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is providing $25,000 in grant funding to assist the Foundation for Wildlife Management (F4WM) with wolf control efforts in Idaho.

“RMEF strongly supports the North American Wildlife Conservation Model which emphasizes the importance of wildlife management so all populations can thrive and be forever sustained,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “That includes predator management, especially in areas where wolves and other predators have profound impacts on elk and other wildlife.”

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) reported a minimum of 786 wolves at the end of 2015 which is more than 600 percent above original agreed upon minimum recovery goals. Biologists also documented a minimum of 108 packs across the state and an additional 20 packs with territories that overlap into Montana, Washington and Wyoming.

“IDFG has stated time and time again that wolves in several areas have unacceptable impacts on elk and other wildlife. This funding will enhance trapping efforts to assist F4WM in the work,” added Allen.

The F4WM also received $25,000 in RMEF funding in 2016.

RMEF is committed to supporting wolf management and has done so by funding grants in Idaho alone totaling $150,000 since 2013.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of nearly 220,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 6.9 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK. Take action: join and/or donate.

Video: Colorado Bull Elk Battle


Incredible footage of two bull elk having it out in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado.

To check out more from this video maker, click here.